American Law Reports (A.L.R.) Celebrates 100 Years in April

The inimitable A.L.R. series of law books published by West (now Thomson Reuters) turns 100 this year. Its narratives, published regularly, that analyze, classify, explain and digest American case law on very narrow legal issues has been an icon of law publishing for many years already. So many great people in law publishing have played a part in its success, quality, and prominence. Many still are.

And, of course, Corpus Juris/Corpus Juris Secundum turns 108 in 2019. American Jurisprudence, 2d is 83. All of them great Rochester, Twin Cities, and one-time Brooklyn/Westbury, N.Y. publications.

 

Robert McKay Celebrates the Bread and Butterworths of Legal Publishing

Famed British legal publisher (and now imprint at Lexis) Butterworths celebrates 200 years in 2018.

Writes McKay: “Very much dependent in early days on the expansion of the British Empire and its legal system, Butterworths, no doubt replete with the English and Christian values of the day, followed it from the British Isles to Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and India employing a mix of structures, acquisitions and partnerships of various degrees of success and some failure.”

Slaw: Complexity of Legal Writing and Analysis Still Stumps AI

Sarah Sutherland over at Slaw.ca:

Start-ups are pivoting away from legal analysis to subject areas that have more accessible datasets and less complicated source material, and those that haven’t frequently struggle to answer simple questions. There are many applications for automated analysis of legal documents, but as far as I can tell so far they tend toward extracting particular information such as judges’ names…”

-and-

Legal documents are some of the most complex writing in English, and it is unlikely that the nuance of what they mean will be an easy target.”